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Osmanthus Petals

Osmanthus Petals

Osmanthus Petals
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Deliciously aromatic dried osmanthus petals

Ingredients: Osmanthus Petals
25g (8-15 cups of tea) $5.95 LOGIN
50g (16-30 cups of tea) $11.95 LOGIN
100g (35-65 cups of tea) $19.95 LOGIN
500g (165-300 cups of tea) $85.95 LOGIN
2kg (670-1300 cups of tea) $294.95 LOGIN

Instructions

  • Serving Size: 1.5g /cup
  • Steeping Temp: 100°C
  • Steeping Time: 5 mins.
  • Certification: Organic
  • Origin: China
  • Caffeine: Caffeine Free

Osmanthus Petals

Osmanthus flowers are known for rich sent and aroma. Like rose petals, osmanthus flowers retain their scent when dried. They are a popular in China, where osmanthus is known as gui hua, and used in cooking and making tea.

Osmanthus trees are found in Asia, particularly in eastern and southern China. They bloom in the fall and the white, yellow, or even orange flowers have sweet scent of apricots. The dried flowers are tiny, about the size of rice kernels, and retain their sweet fragrance.

Osmanthus tea is naturally caffeine-free and consists of dried golden yellow flower petals. Loose leaf is typically made by placing the buds in an infuser and pouring hot water over them, allowing them to steep for a few minutes before removing the infuser. The tea has a slightly sweet, delicate buttery flavor and a flowery aroma, which some proponents claim, helps suppress appetite.

It is common to mix osmanthus flowers with oolong or green tea. They would only need a sprinkle of dry osmanthus petals before steeping with hot water and for the nice aroma to bloom.

Osmanthus flowers can also be used to infuse sugar and custards, the same way that many cooks use vanilla beans or to lend a delicate note to savory dishes in much the same way that they use saffron.

Story, Folklore, History...

Osmanthus are popular shrubs in parks and gardens throughout the warm temperate zone. Several hybrids and cultivars have been developed. In China, osmanthus tea is produced by combining dried Sweet Osmanthus flowers with black or green tea leaves in much the same manner the more familiar jasmine tea combines jasmine flowers with tea leaves.

Osmanthus is a genus of about 30 species of flowering plants in the family Oleaceae, mostly native to warm temperate Asia (from the Caucasus east to Japan). They range in size from shrubs to small trees, 2-12 m tall. The flowers are produced in spring, summer or autumn, each flower being about 1 cm long, white, with a four-lobed tubular-based corolla ('petals')..

Tasting Notes

Certification: Organic

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From the Shanti Canada Tea Blog:

Tea Legends: The Moon Princess - Osmanthus Petals

Tea Legends: The Moon Princess - Osmanthus Petals - by Shanti Tea

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Osmanthus is a species containing over 30 different varieties, most of them hailing from Asia, but one native to the United States as well. These plants give a lovely dried petal of bright yellow, and can be drunk on their own if desired for health reasons, or combined with black or green tea leaves in much the same manner the more familiar jasmine tea combines jasmine flowers with tea leaves.

Osmanthus are popular shrubs in parks and gardens throughout the warm temperate zone. Several hybrids and cultivars have been developed, and osmanthus’ place in both the tea drinking world and in Chinese medicine, which has more and more of an appeal to Western culture, are well established.

Beyond its medical applications, osmanthus is also used to make a valuable perfume. The flowers, which range from white to light yellow to a deep orange like the ones featured through our tea company, are all capable of producing a lovely scent. However, the deeper colored flowers are generally regarded as producing the nicest perfume, and are therefore...

Read the rest of the article on our blog.